Archive for the interior design Category

wedding

Posted in architecture, artifacts, culture, food, interior design, lifestyle, locales, people, religion on January 20, 2012 by mijodo

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Ah weddings and their many traditions to a lasting and happy marriage!

In the US, the wedding tradition starts with the bride-to-be looking for her wedding gown in bridal stores where the salesperson attending to her can show and deliver what the bride to be has always envisioned for herself during that special day. In doing so, the bride wears the probable gowns for fitting and showcasing them to her accompanying mother, sisters, girlfriends, and sometimes her groom for the right bridal dress design. After consultation, the chosen gown is to be worn again on the very day of the wedding.

In Philippine weddings, the bride to be can still look for a dress or have his fantabulous gown designed to her liking, but it is a definite no-no to fit the gown itself or lest the wedding is doomed not to go through at all. Hence the designers would only allow the bride to fit the lining such that no mishap can happen just before the wedding.  And all what the groom can do is to wait for his bride at the altar in quiet anticipation.

And this was what Rigor did while Jenny slowly glided toward him at the long red carpet, and beautiful flower blossoms at the side at the long red carpet – just wait and gushed over how beautiful Jenny was in her beaded gown accentuated with the up-do hairstyle and fresh looking make-up, exclusively for that matrimonial date.

(lg2a) medium

Posted in architecture, artifacts, culture, events, interior design, letsgopinas goes to america, lifestyle, locales, people, religion, tradition, travel with tags , , , , on April 24, 2011 by mijodo

Happy Easter

(No article has been produced since these two words that I have written, many months ago, to acclaim the Lord’s resurrection from death and entry to heaven. I promised myself not to write until I come back home to get back my life.)

November 2, 2011

Some months ago, as my relatives and I trekked back to the iconic travel-must, Disney World in Orlando, Florida, we passed by this beautifully erected Catholic church in Hanceville, Alabama, in the farmlands of Cullman. This monastic church of  The Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament was built by the adorably telegenic Mother Angelica, founder of EWTN (Eternal World Television Network).

After being instructed by the Lord to “build a temple” in 1995, Mother Angelica was able to finish the construction in 1999.  The church’s medieval appearance seems to be substantial in architecture, particularly with the fortress like form  of the Castle of San Miguel (a gift shop) fronting the church. Inside, the cavernous church, one will be able to draw the sense of awe and aspiration to be with God and the Creator. The interiors are rightly so grand and opulent (despite being run by the Poor Clare Nuns of the Perpetual Adoration, the congregation joined in by Mother Angelica) with marble floors, vaulted ceilings, and the gold leafed tabernacle. It is said that masses there are observed with a highly inspiring choir, orchestrated by the cloistered nuns themselves, behind the heavy altar grills.

As a sidenote, if you get to be in one of the masses, try to look for this youngish couple with all twelve kids in tow, all in their sunday formals (guys in dark jackets, and girls in laced short veils), and all sitting from youngest to eldest. The Pro-life advocates of the Church will be too happy to know this.

Testament. The church building and the media network themselves are testament to Mother Angelica’s own calling to serve God and his purpose. In the Philippines, a bastion of the Catholic Church, there have been many who have effectively used not only the pulpit, but the far-reaching, television and radio mass media to instill the values propagated by Vatican to access a bigger Filipino audience.

In the 80’s, the Dominican Father Sonny Ramirez  was the most popular priest with an affable demeanor, away from the cliched stringently inflexible personalities of priests in robes then.  Father Ramirez’s use of street language and fresh insights were utilized very well in  his own television show, Sharing in the City.

The Philippine Catholic Church has its own AM station, Radyo Veritas, DZRV which has its own league of priests, like Father Larry Faraon, and Monsignor Teddy Bacani that have disseminated the Word of God inside the Filipino homes and even outside the Philippines, mostly Asian countries (anchored by their respective Asian priests).

Through the years, there have been other religious personalities that have made waves and gained eminence in  media with their endeavors.  Music composers like Father Eduardo Hontiveros and Father Manoling Francisco, both Jesuits, have produced songs that have heavily penetrated the Filipino consciousness such as Papuri sa Diyos and Hindi Kita Malilimutan, respectively. Another Jesuit, Father James B. Reuter, although American, has been a strong ally of Philippine Theater, particularly in the 50s and the 60s, showing off Filipino thespic talents.  Too bad, his theater success , unlike songs and movies, is difficult to record and remember for today’s audience.

Lived Life. Many of the names that have been mentioned are quite lucky to find out their true calling in life – this time in preaching the name of the Lord, using the vast formats of media.  Such persuasions are gathered from the fired up passions of their hearts and the gentle murmurs that excite their minds. It is just a matter of action, and true perseverance before they get to realize all their lofty dreams, all their big aspirations.  But everything starts from saying “yes” to such calling – whether it is in the realm of religion, politics, business or other beliefs that are provoked by the spirit of a higher entity.

I come back to the Philippines, to my home country, fully knowing that this is where all my efforts should be realized. I just respond to my innermost desires and convictions, just like all those who were lucky to have known what they have been called for in life.  Abroad, my life was just a cruel negation of all my heart’s and mind’s interests. I had to constantly whisper to myself that I just had to come back.

As I arrived in Manila, on the day of the dead, November 1, 2011, my Easter has truly come. Now, I live.

(lg2a) enclaves of the rich and famous

Posted in architecture, artifacts, culture, events, fashion, history, interior design, letsgopinas goes to america, lifestyle, locales, news, people, travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2011 by mijodo

Oh to be famous and rich. Well I can comfortably settle for just being rich – in fact, filthy rich.

Cousin Barbara and I, together with some Los Angeles tourists,  hopped on to this white, open top, vehicle that should bring us to the hills of Hollywoodland and its environs. Again, just like what we had done at the Oscar grounds (https://letsgopinas.wordpress.com/2011/03/04/oh-oscar/), we became gawkers and probably even snoops of such exulted showbiz personalities and their real estate acqusitions.

Again, my cousin and I, make ourselves small, just by listening to such trivial celebrity information amusingly dished out to us by our driver/travel guide as we meandered in the uber exclusive roads within the Beverly Hills and Bel-Air Villages. But our first stop was where the famous Hollywood sign was perched on the top of the hill. Our driver mentioned that  in the 1930s one young aspiring actress who had been frustrated with her unsatisfying career, climbed up on one of the letters of the Hollywood sign, and leapt to her death. The following day, a letter arrived to inform her supposedly of a starring role on a film.

On a more fun note, the tour went through the houses and mansions of Hollywood and American society A-listers and some B celebrities, including Dr. Phil, Bob Barker of Price is Right,  Laurence Fishburne of CSI, Richard Gere, the late red head comedienne, Lucille Ball, and the prepubescent’s idols, the Jonas Brothers.  Each home is palatial, grand, and speaks much of the owner’s taste and requirements. At the outside, Nicolas Cage’s residence is romantic yet dark in tone, with patches of garden moss attached on its brick red facade. Celebrity heiress, Paris Hilton’s family residence has its name – West Haven, emblazoned on the perimeter wall.  Such shows the Hilton family’s self importance.  Even the guide, acerbicly asked us, “Does your house have a name?”

But whose ego is said to be as big as his Beverly Hills estate? According to our scornfully loquacious driver – it is no other than  Tom Cruise.  While tangentially passing by Tom Cruise’s place (we never actually saw his home at the top of hill, blocked by other houses), our driver mentioned that if Tom Cruise’s presence is inside the mansion, a white flag is propped up in his property.  Well during our trip, there is no flag to signal his actual stay in the mansion.

The story may just be one of the legends concocted by these enterprising travel guides to make the trip fun and interesting. Afterall, such big showbiz royalties don’t announce their presence just like that –  for obvious security reasons.  I am even wondering, how is it possible that such enclaves are open for curious tourists and outsiders to see, and possibly furthermore to inspect their actual garbage bins outside their homes (saw several at Richard Gere’s charming home.)

Certainly, homeowners of our own exclusive villages in Makati, Ortigas and Alabang will never allow such oglers in their territories. It is just too risky in terms of security, and too outlandish in terms of privacy. But yes in the Philippines, posh enclaves for the rich and probably infamous have burgeoned for several decades. The old rich , and even the ambassadors to the Philippines, may have settled in ritzy Forbes Park and Dasmarinas Village in Makati. The noveau rich may have opted to dwell in Ayala, Alabang or in the tall glass buidings of Fort Bonifacio.  But of course, there are still members of the family manning the genteel homes of Malate where the wealthy families took residence during the pre-war era.

While it is sure that these great big homes, whether in the Philippines or in Los Angeles, have happy families and individuals occupying them, there are still houses and haunts that have saddening and even paranormal experiences.  Our driver at the roadtrip had a serious tone when we passedby the last residence of Michael Jackson where he had been last taken out to the hospital for drug overdose. He also made mention of Marilyn Monroe’s apparition, visiting a favorite hotel – the Roosevelt Hotel at Hollywood Boulevard.  And just before his death, John Belushi’had gone to one favorite nightclub, the Guitar Center, and even ate his last meal – consisting of lentil soup.

And of course the tour would never be complete without the driver pinpointing where Hugh Grant made his scandalous mistake with a local prostitute – at the alleyways, near the KFC store. Oh, to be rich and horny, this time.

get crazy and high

Posted in architecture, events, health, interior design, lifestyle, locales, news, people, sports, technology, travel with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2010 by mijodo

 If New York has the Empire State Building, and Paris has the Eiffel Tower, then Cebu may just have Crown Regency Hotel. Afterall, in these tall landmarks, it is not unusual for many tourists and locals to come up, and take in all the panoramic views the eyes can afford to see from such edifices. People in the city of New York clamber up to the 86th floor of the famed Art-deco office building to set eyes on the uniformed street blocks of Manhattan and its countless skyscrapers. In Paris, all try to move up into the observation platform of the iron tower of Eiffel, and gush at the lush garden sceneries down below, particularly the Trocadero Fountains. But once in Cebu, visitors go to the highest floors of the hotel edifice, and try to admire the vast aerial views of the metropolis, but possibly, even quite literally, with a twist.

 Of course at the very top of the building which is said to be the  tallest in Cebu, and probably in the whole Philippines, there are the usual coin operated binoculars and telescopes to zoom in on specific areas of Cebu City, but one can be most appreciative of the commanding and extensive views of the city without the necessity of such peering device. But alas, still that would be a little unexciting as there are more atypical ways to get a 360 degree views of this historic and economically robust southern city destination through the Sky Experience Adventure, at the very top of the Crown Regency, along President Osmena Boulevard.

Take the Plunge.  One can even get out of the comfort zone by checking the vista a little outside the perimeter of the building through its Edge Coaster. At the 39th floor, one can take on the ride, similar to the cabs of a rollercoaster, that takes you around the building, yet facing full frontally the views. But then the seat tilts down 55 degrees giving one the impression of plunging 430 feet towards the ground. In fact, if both parties (the cab can only seat two at a time) decide to increase the slant more, the seat can even go to an extreme 90 degree down slope. But then one gets to realize that one is strapped safely at the coaster. Still the experience is intense and may not be advisable for those who have the fear of falling.

 The ride starts with the gracious staff giving all pointers for safety. And not like the usual rollercoaster where cabs move together, each cab in the Edge Coaster moves independently. Then the cab slowly tips over and gives one that feeling of falling down. One just prays that one does not actually fall off from the seat. Expectedly, people just hold on to the to the seat’s handlebars for dear life. But as the cab moves slowly around, then the safety features of the ride are guaranteed ok. During the ride, it is a little straining and awkward for some because of the position they are in. But then the ride is not very long, it just goes around for a minute or so.

 Look Ma, No Railings. If the Edge Coaster gives one a sensation of dropping toward land, another feature of the Sky Experience Adventure, the Sky Walk provides an impression of flying – or at least walking on air. At the 38th floor of the building, there is a four foot wide ramp around the building to walk on, without the supposed security of the railings or barrier. At the ramp there is only the harness which is securely tied from the ceiling to the suit worn by person that provides some sense of protection.  The harness’s length is short enough to make the person stay only on at the ramp, making it difficult for one to fall off from the ledge. Again, one gets to see the whole scenic vistas of Cebu. But of course, somehow there is just more mind thrill when one is romping around on the tallest building in the city, and without supposedly the safety net of the guardrails.

 But indeed, the Sky Experience Adventure team does all the precautionary procedures to avoid all untoward incidents. The team of ladies and gentlemen who have mostly mountaineering experience briefs everyone on the safety measures provided for the Skywalk Experience and how everyone should conduct himself during the walk. One must don on the blue and yellow suit specifically for such walk. And if there are those who are in slippers or highheeled shoes, the team can lend rubbershoes to provide them sole traction while on the ramp. The team also says that harnesses which can carry a weight of 5000 pounds are there for the utmost safety of the people. The ramp is strong enough and can accommodate a number of people at a given moment.

Then people are instructed to get out of the building premises, and go out and step on the actual walkway. Together with some members of the team crew, people are instructed to start walking guided by the harnesses that dangle from ceiling top. With some trepidation, one walks, and in due time, he or she enjoys a seeming moment of freedom. Then somehow, one is even emboldened to perch and sit at the very rim of the pathway. Or he can show off  a one foot standing trick at the glass edge as well, directed by the team leader. Everything can be documented by an official photographer that goes along with group for the romp.

Everything to see and feel. During the day time, you get the whole arresting vista of Cebu’s Metropolis, with the Cebu Harbor at the Southeast, and the other neighboring cities of Mandaue, Lapu-Lapu, Naga and Talisay.  There might be some challenge to find famous landmarks of Cebu such as Tops at the hills of Busay. But definitely, one can easily find the iconic memorial plaza – the Fuente Osmena Circle, and of course, further up – the beautiful and majestic Capitol building of Cebu Province.

And since the Sky Experience Adventure opens until past midnight, particularly during weekends, it is very worthy to visit and participate in both rides during the evenings as well to see the luminous lights of the Capitol and Fuente Osmena Circle, and experience another enthralling aspect of the whole Cebu City. One must do the rides then twice – during the day and during the night.

Bill Killgore, General Manager of Sky Experience Adventure, devised ways to make the rides affordable, even offering two rides for the price of one promotion, many times. The patrons even get a certificate after each ride – detailing the exact date, time and even the condition of the weather. Then of course, one can purchase a picture of himself enjoying the rides, and if hungry, then he may have some food at the Sky Lounge or Sky Resto Bar.

And if there is some more money to spend, one can go several floors down to watch and experience a movie of a 4D kind! In other words, not only will he view movie scenes almost realistically through state of the art magic, he also experiences and definitely feels everything almost authentically what is shown on the screen. It is not good to spoil a film by spilling out the details, but it is recommended that one brings a hanky or small towel at the theater.

Bill Killgore, recollects that Cebu locals had some hesitations when the Sky Experience Adventure started late 2008, and it was people outside Cebu who were more adventurous and enthusiastic to partake in such rides. But it has changed through the months. In fact one local Cebuano guy, through the help of the Sky Adventure Experience team and its manager, surprised his girlfriend and popped the ultimate question – “Will you marry me?” – at the 38th Floor during their promenade at the Sky Walk. “I am just waiting that a marriage ceremony will be done here one of these days,” Killgore says a matter of factly. Well, that surely is another way of taking the plunge – 30 plus floors above the ground in Cebu.

(lg2a) sorry, we just don’t have any space

Posted in architecture, artifacts, culture, events, history, interior design, letsgopinas goes to america, lifestyle, locales, people, travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 15, 2010 by mijodo

 

 

After some little shopping at Madison Avenue, in New York City, my sister Christie accompanied me and our niece, Ernestine to Metropolitan Museum of Art or the Met as it is popularly monickered.

We were ready to pay for the entrance fee however for some reason, the lady assistant attending to us said fees were waived that day. Instead we could make some donation, if we wish too. My sister handed in 25 Dollars for the three of us, and rented out two audio guide players to accompany us throughout the exhibits. My sister, who has been there many times, was pleasantly surpised about the fee arrangement.

And I was giddy about coming into the halls and the cloisters of the much vaunted and iconic Met. Aside from the financial district, and the skyscrapers defining New York City, it is the plethora of cultural staples that mark New York City as a “global city.”  Plays and music of Broadway, distinct ethnic communities, and a number of significant museum buidings just put New York into that cliche as the city “that never sleeps.”

Well, I almost never slept, right after the museum visit. My thoughts wandered after a seemingly innocent comment from another lady assistant inside the museum.

After taking a look at the Egyptian collection, the Americana artifacts, classical European statues and paintings, I checked out the Asian treasures, particularly the ones from South East Asia, afterall Philippines is part of that region. However I noticed right away, that only relics from Indonesia, Vietnam, and Thailand were occupying the huge corner space of the museum.

My instant reaction was to look for the museum person probably guarding the South East Asian pieces. “Do you have some artifacts from the Philippines?” I asked, hoping that the lady knows that Philippines is part of that particular Asian region.

“Sorry, we just don’t have any space,” was the lame excuse of the lady.

I did not push the issue. I felt sorry for the Philippines. In the huge halls of the august museum, there seemed no representative piece from my country. “Not even the Man in the Barrel woodpiece from Baguio,” I told jokingly to my sister.

I was incensed and disturbed. Didn”t the Metropolitan Museum of the Art know that Philippines is part of South East Asia? Or did the Met think we only have “rebultos and santos,” such that this Philippine collection might only mar a decidedly Oriental character of the space which is full of ceramic plates and buddha statues all around. But the Philippines does have pre-hispanic ceramic plates and jars excavation finds. Probably our National Museum should lend some of our collection pieces used by our pre-Christian ancestors – mostly Aetas and Indo-Malay ascendants.

The seeming  faux pas on Met’s side begs a deeper question. Is the Philippines’s culture and civilization not significant for the visitors to see and understand. Apparently, we as a people from the Philippines know that we had a culture similar to our Asian neighbors, but the Western countries which colonize our islands apparently had severe influence in our way of living up to this moment.  Probably to many outside the Philippines, we, as a people, are neither here nor there – brown skinned, chinky eyed Asians who have unwavering loyalty to Catholicism (from the Spanish), and talk and write good American English.  

Obviously, the Philippine archeological antiquities will never be found in the European collection nor in the Americana mementos of the Met or probably in any sensible museum.

Too bad for us, Filipinos and too bad for Met’s visitors, as there is much to take and see from our unique Filipino heritage – buddhas or no buddhas.

(lg2a) this is not panama city, panama

Posted in architecture, artifacts, culture, events, food, health, history, interior design, letsgopinas goes to america, lifestyle, locales, nature, people, sports, travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 17, 2010 by mijodo

 

An aunt from Canada was to attend a family member’s wake and burial in Panama City, Florida. However instead of going directly to one of the gulf cities of Florida, she found herself in another part of North America –  at Panama City, Panama.

Probably this story has been retold amongst family members countless times, just to regale ourselves and have some hearty guffaws at such an oddball experience.  But it did happen, and can happen even in the Philippines. If you want to go to San Fernando, make sure which Luzon capital city you are stopping by – the one in Pampanga for some culinary experience or La Union for some surfing action in nearby town, San Juan.

When you think about “Cagayan,” you do ask yourself, “Is this the capital, Cagayan de Oro City of Misamis Oriental of Northern Mindanao or is this Cagayan Province of Northern Luzon?” Cagayan de Oro City boasts of whitewater rafting activities and a busy seaport while Cagayan Province has cave exploration and spelunking for tourists. But “Cagayan Province” should not be confused with “Cagayan Valley” or the whole Region 2 area,  which is composed of the provinces of Batanes, Isabela, Nueva Vizcaya, Quirino, and Cagayan Province.

Another name, “Davao,” set in the Mindanao turf, sets chaos probably among the minds of Filipino students studying for a geography quiz. Davao City which is the business and tourism hub of Mindanao is independent of any province, including Davao del Norte and Davao del Sur. Davao del Norte’s capital is Tagum City while Davao del Sur’s is Digos. Interestingly, and even probably more confusingly, Davao del Norte’s official and newest name is Davao Province.
But heck, after some stressful geography lessons in the Philippines, I guess it is time for some destressing which you can get plenty of in Panama City Beach Florida which is distinct from Panama City, Panama.
(For some personal pics on my travel to America, please click on this: https://letsgopinas.wordpress.com/letsgopinas-goes-2-america/)
——-
Panama City may not be a top of mind destination in Florida. Miami and Orlando should be prime city targets among travellers in the socalled Sunshine State. However Panama City, together with adjacent environ, Panama City Beach has so much to offer for the sunworshippers – torquoise waters, powdery white shores, and magnificent sunsets. Americans from the Southern states usually enjoy the beaches and the countless high rise accommodations that line the area. Families during the summers and students the socalled springbreak troop to the 27 miles of stunning beachfront sceneries of Panama City Beach.
And between Panama City, Florida, and the country, Panama is the Carribean Gulf. This piece of info should settle the confusion once and for all.
——–
As we try to hairsplit these geographical names, how about finding out where the phonetically troublesome and originally named town of “Sexmoan” is.
—–
How about “Sasmuan, Pampanga.”

many mansions

Posted in architecture, artifacts, culture, events, history, interior design, lifestyle, locales, people, travel with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2010 by mijodo

As they say, people from Iloilo may not be as gregarious as their Bacolodnon counterparts who celebrate the good life with much gusto and much more moolah. It is even more prounounce right now that there is a Casino in that Negros Occidental city, and none in Iloilo. Apparently, Ilonggos take more pleasure in simple joys.

But still, as I went around, with my cousin Rolle Depakakibo and nephew Thad Depakakibo through the narrow residential streets of Iloilo City, one can certainly imagine the ritzy lifestyle that Ilonggos may have had in the distant past, particularly during the 1950s and 60s.  The old stately mansions of Iloilo are still there to be admired. The almost palatial Lopez family (ABSCBN and then Meralco Owner) ancestral homes still has that gleam and glamor as it features a beautifully manicured green lawn. It is said that it even has its own elevator – definitely an obscurity during that era.

The iconic Lizares Mansion has that gothic appeal, but is said to imbue colonial architecture. But definitely the ornate facade and beams create a rococo – almost baroque feel to the viewer. The Lizares residence has been converted to a Dominican School, Angelicum.

Another home worth a look is the Ledesma Family residence that features statuaries of eagles around the perimeter walls. Definitely, smaller than those of the Lizares’s or Lopez’s, but it does catch attention to those possibly wanting to go to nearby Guimaras Island Province as the wharf is just nearby.

Once you get to gawk at these Iloilo mansions, let other lifestyle imaginings explore your mind – the Packard and Mustang vintage family cars, the sugar plantation booms and bangus (milkfish) fishpond wealth,  the exclusive Assumption Girl School, much respected San Agustin School, the Candelaria Fiesta, mahjong and cockfighting sessions, and the fabulous Kahirup Club Social Balls.