Archive for the tradition Category

pre-wedding

Posted in artifacts, culture, events, fashion, lifestyle, people, religion, tradition with tags , , , , , , on December 29, 2011 by mijodo

Ah love and its many rituals leading to a perfect wedding!

At present, I am not quite sure if a man formally proposing to his girlfriend to become his wife is already part of the Filipino contemporary traditions before marriage.  I know it is big in the USA. The man gets on his knee, and puts on that 2 carat rock on the lady’s finger, and she flashes the ring to everyone who may just witness such expression of love that should end up in matrimony some months later.

But what I do know that Filipino custom of Pamamanhikan is that official declaration to the parents on both sides that an of age man and his girlfriend have settled on a date for church matrimony. Usually the parents of the man would come to the girl’s house to formally ask her parents for her proverbial hand. And if the girl’s parents consent to such proposal, a hearty dinner meal is feasted on to show unity, harmony, and accordance in the blending of basically two families through the coming marriage of two distinct people.

I am not quite sure how the pamamanhikan of Jennifer Casiano and Rigor Soliven had gone, but when I took some pre-nuptial pictures of them, they  intimated the hassles and costs of all the wants and needs for the coming big, successful wedding ceremony at Sto. Domingo Church in Quezon City on December 28, 2011.

In that one December morning, just before the wedding, Jenny and Rigor had to squeeze in their very hectic schedule, the pre-nup photography which probably a decade ago never existed to be part of the numerous steps leading to that church ceremony. For a photographer like me, I am just honored to be doing it for a couple who wants it. But really how important is it to have a set of pictures for a couple, just before getting into a kasal?

The preparation for a wedding can be a big headache for a couple since it entails so much details and possible snags. And of course, where does a couple who only wants to enjoy their actual day of wedding go to?

The phenomenon of a wedding planner has reached not only Metro Manila, but perhaps even in the provinces where wedding preparation used to be a family, or even a community effort – particularly when roasting the pig or bigger yet, a calf.

After finding the right wedding planner, then the  groom and the bride-to- be choos the motif/style/theme for the coming wedding that she dreams of since perhaps she was a child. It can be sleek and chic or it can be grand and fabulous for every guest to remember. The wedding planner gives all the options and suggestions for the couple to decide on, constrained possibly by only the budget.

Will the wedding be in a cathedral or on the beachfront? Will the choir music envelop the whole church? Will flowers abound as the wife marches to the altar? Will the reception be inside a ballroom of a hotel? Will the food be served ala carte or buffet style? Will there be a five-tiered cake or will cupcakes create that whimsy wedding for the couple?

With a hundred or so needs until the wedding and reception are over, the role of the wedding planner has been important for the busy couple who just wants their wedding to be memorable and enjoyable, not only for the guests, but most importantly to the couple themselves.

And I just wish that Jenny and Rigor just had the same fun and excitement planning their wedding, with or without the wedding planner.

 

(lg2a) smallville, new york

Posted in architecture, artifacts, culture, events, history, letsgopinas goes to america, locales, nature, people, tradition with tags , , , , , , , , on November 22, 2011 by mijodo

“Have you been to a place, far away from it all…?” – from the song Lost Horizon of the movie musicale with the same title.

This is how I felt all throughout when I stayed at that upstate locale, Jeffersonville in the state of New York for almost two months for a job stint.

There is a sense of isolation, a sense of being alone, specially so that there is not much of a distraction from any of the popular fastfood area, or  from any of the large shopping malls and groceries within this small village.

For those missing the citylife, it is almost cruel irony, that the borough of Manhattan, the world’s financial district, and densely populated by famous skyscrapers and megastructures is merely about 3 1/2 hours away.  However for the unfortunate ones who don’t own cars, it will take several hundred bucks for a one way taxi-ride, and that is – if there is one willing to take you there.  For a direct bus ride from the area, you have to thank the Jeffersonville Bank (the lone bank in the entire area) to sponsor one bus that should take 60 people for a bustrip to the city. And this momentous excursion happens every three months – once for every season at a reduced price of 30 dollars – two way.

However if you are not into the grime and fast paced city living, then surely you will take in all what you can from leisurely life of Jeffersonville.  From a good vantage point, there is the stretch of mountains and hills all over to envelop your visual sense.  Then trek down the scenic waterways  and probably, have a canoe ride at Delaware River.  Admire the architectural Americana of houses and inns that will transport your imagination to Jefferson’s storied past, settled in by mostly Eastern Europeans.  Saunter and buy something for yourself in several of the eclectic mix of antique shops, themed restaurants and one mini-grocery in what the community calls “Downtown.”

Overall, this is a sleepy town, no doubt. This is where you cocoon yourself to take that hobby of potterymaking, photography, or probably, in my case, blog writing to further level. This is where you consume sleep and rest without distraction from any of the urban excesses such as traffic, pollution, noise and even excessive workload.

But it is not everyday snoozetown at Jeff (nickname for the place).  Every so often, the relaxed routine at Jeffersonville is punctuated by activities that should excite its dwellers, and should invite tourists and guests to partake in.

During the summer month of August, at nearby Bethel Woods Center of the Arts, there is a number of rock and pop bands dishing out their musical wares to celebrate the Woodstock phenomenon in year 1969.  Today, people flock to this museum cum open air auditorium  overlooking the original farmland where the now iconic, three day rock festival happened, and enjoy the spirit of the legendary musicians and bands that participated before – Joan Baez, Santana, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Grateful Dead, Blood, Sweat and Tears, and a lot more.

And during one weekend in October, frenzied photographers take pictures and create photoessays about the lives of people inside Jeffersonville.  Eddie Adams, a native of this place and Pulitzer Prize winner for an iconic Vietnam news photograph, created a seminar of sorts for those interested in documenting life in still pictures some years ago. A hundred students still attend this important annual lecture-workshop series that is graced by professionals from National Geographic, New York Times, Sports Illustrated in furthering their eye for photojournalism.

Surely there is no Filipino community in this area, unlike perhaps Manhattan or even Queens. But in the very heart of Jeffersonville, there is a motley crew of Filipinos working and caring for many of its ageing and psychologically challenged residents.  The owners and workers of Jeffersonville Senior Living have accommodated their guests with the unique Filipino way of giving utmost kindness and servitude. Jeffersonville may be remote and out of the way, but to its denizens and the Filipinos staying for the meantime, just like the Burt Bacharach song suggests, it is  “Lost Horizon.”

Lost Horizon

Have you ever dreamed of a place Far away from it all
Where the air you breathe is soft and clean And children play in fields of green
And the sound of guns Doesn’t pound in your ears  (anymore)
Have you ever dreamed of a place
Far away from it all
Where the winter winds will never blow
And living things have room to grow And the sound of guns Doesn’t pound in your ears anymore.
Many miles from yesterday before you reach tomorrow
Where the time is always just today
There’s a lost horizon, waiting to be found.
There’s a lost   horizon Where the sound of guns
Doesn’t pound in your ears anymore.

(lg2a) medium

Posted in architecture, artifacts, culture, events, interior design, letsgopinas goes to america, lifestyle, locales, people, religion, tradition, travel with tags , , , , on April 24, 2011 by mijodo

Happy Easter

(No article has been produced since these two words that I have written, many months ago, to acclaim the Lord’s resurrection from death and entry to heaven. I promised myself not to write until I come back home to get back my life.)

November 2, 2011

Some months ago, as my relatives and I trekked back to the iconic travel-must, Disney World in Orlando, Florida, we passed by this beautifully erected Catholic church in Hanceville, Alabama, in the farmlands of Cullman. This monastic church of  The Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament was built by the adorably telegenic Mother Angelica, founder of EWTN (Eternal World Television Network).

After being instructed by the Lord to “build a temple” in 1995, Mother Angelica was able to finish the construction in 1999.  The church’s medieval appearance seems to be substantial in architecture, particularly with the fortress like form  of the Castle of San Miguel (a gift shop) fronting the church. Inside, the cavernous church, one will be able to draw the sense of awe and aspiration to be with God and the Creator. The interiors are rightly so grand and opulent (despite being run by the Poor Clare Nuns of the Perpetual Adoration, the congregation joined in by Mother Angelica) with marble floors, vaulted ceilings, and the gold leafed tabernacle. It is said that masses there are observed with a highly inspiring choir, orchestrated by the cloistered nuns themselves, behind the heavy altar grills.

As a sidenote, if you get to be in one of the masses, try to look for this youngish couple with all twelve kids in tow, all in their sunday formals (guys in dark jackets, and girls in laced short veils), and all sitting from youngest to eldest. The Pro-life advocates of the Church will be too happy to know this.

Testament. The church building and the media network themselves are testament to Mother Angelica’s own calling to serve God and his purpose. In the Philippines, a bastion of the Catholic Church, there have been many who have effectively used not only the pulpit, but the far-reaching, television and radio mass media to instill the values propagated by Vatican to access a bigger Filipino audience.

In the 80’s, the Dominican Father Sonny Ramirez  was the most popular priest with an affable demeanor, away from the cliched stringently inflexible personalities of priests in robes then.  Father Ramirez’s use of street language and fresh insights were utilized very well in  his own television show, Sharing in the City.

The Philippine Catholic Church has its own AM station, Radyo Veritas, DZRV which has its own league of priests, like Father Larry Faraon, and Monsignor Teddy Bacani that have disseminated the Word of God inside the Filipino homes and even outside the Philippines, mostly Asian countries (anchored by their respective Asian priests).

Through the years, there have been other religious personalities that have made waves and gained eminence in  media with their endeavors.  Music composers like Father Eduardo Hontiveros and Father Manoling Francisco, both Jesuits, have produced songs that have heavily penetrated the Filipino consciousness such as Papuri sa Diyos and Hindi Kita Malilimutan, respectively. Another Jesuit, Father James B. Reuter, although American, has been a strong ally of Philippine Theater, particularly in the 50s and the 60s, showing off Filipino thespic talents.  Too bad, his theater success , unlike songs and movies, is difficult to record and remember for today’s audience.

Lived Life. Many of the names that have been mentioned are quite lucky to find out their true calling in life – this time in preaching the name of the Lord, using the vast formats of media.  Such persuasions are gathered from the fired up passions of their hearts and the gentle murmurs that excite their minds. It is just a matter of action, and true perseverance before they get to realize all their lofty dreams, all their big aspirations.  But everything starts from saying “yes” to such calling – whether it is in the realm of religion, politics, business or other beliefs that are provoked by the spirit of a higher entity.

I come back to the Philippines, to my home country, fully knowing that this is where all my efforts should be realized. I just respond to my innermost desires and convictions, just like all those who were lucky to have known what they have been called for in life.  Abroad, my life was just a cruel negation of all my heart’s and mind’s interests. I had to constantly whisper to myself that I just had to come back.

As I arrived in Manila, on the day of the dead, November 1, 2011, my Easter has truly come. Now, I live.

(lg2a) bakya mo, van gogh

Posted in architecture, artifacts, culture, fashion, history, letsgopinas goes to america, lifestyle, locales, nature, people, tradition, travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 5, 2011 by mijodo

Somehow this blog has reached Dutch country – Holland, Michigan, that is.

Cousin Barbara, and her husband, Eliot,  invited me to go aboard their recreational vehicle to visit the quaint city of Holland, about 190 miles, West of Detroit, or about 2 hours and 30 minutes of  drive while enjoying the lavish accommodation and some good conversation inside the behemoth vehicle.

Apparently, at that time, we missed out on some pretty tulip blossoms which usually make their abundant presence felt during the month of May. But I knew aside from the tulips, there would be other attractions that could be seen in this settlement, founded by the Dutch settlers that arrived mid 19th Century to establish their own religious sect, outside Holland – the country, that is.

And most definitely, there is a wealth of Dutch knowledge to be had at Neli’s Dutch Village Theme Park. Costumes, dances, music, and food which includes their famous cheese are all featured by young kids that come from generations of Dutch people who braved settling to this area.  The theme park and other Holland City landmarks celebrate the famous people from Holland where arts and crafts are salient part of its culture.

Famous Flemish painters like Rembrandt and Vermeer have their works featured at Holland’s museum while there is a depiction of Vincent Van Gogh, painting his famous “Sunflowers” series inside Neli’s theme park.

Aside from the windmills that create power and  the charming blue and white ceramics, it is their use of a pair of klompen that can generate some smiles and heartening guffaws from us outside of Holland.

Klompen are those danish wooden clogs, used during the olden times for farming and everyday use, specially for wet and damp grounds. It may feel hard on  the feet, but the wearer has put on thick socks for convenience. Today, klompen is just a reminder of Danish culture and tradition (even for folkloric dancing), and has become a favorite tourist souvenir kitsch, particularly the miniaturized ones.

In the Philippines, we have something quite similar – the bakya. These are wooden strapless sandals that were for everyday use, by women in their kimonas or other Filipino traditional dresses, particularly in the 1950s. Unlike in using the klompen, the Filipino women didn’t need to use socks or stockings when putting on the bakya hence it may be inconvenient on the feet. Hence the bakya production dwindled when the more comfortable rubber slippers were introduced.

But then bakya made a comback in the late 1970s up to  the early 1980s when the lowly bakya was adopted by a Filipino brand, Happy Feet. The bakya became a rage for the college crowd that went almost subversive against the elite shoe fashion brands from Europe.

During the 70s and 80s, the women and even the more avantgarde men happily wore bakyas for them to be seen as cool and unpretentious. However bakya, particularly in 1950s was synonymous to the hoi polloi or the masa hence Filipino director Lamberto Avellana angrily coined the phrase “bakya crowd,” particularly for the Filipino audience that appreciated low brow movies which the National Artist never subscribed to when making films. Today, such derogatory phrase has moved on to just one word – “bakya” – that is to describe a mentality that is unhip, unfashionable, unsophisticated and unclassy even outside the realm of movie preference, again, associated with the Filipino masses.

Are Van Gogh and his art bakya? Sosyal!

beyond the waves

Posted in artifacts, culture, events, health, history, locales, nature, news, people, technology, tradition, travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 15, 2011 by mijodo

 (Author’s Note:  I wrote this article and took the accompanying pictures, for a certain publication about two years ago. And about a week ago, somehow I decided that this article about Aurora  Province where a tsunami had taken place in the 18th century would be posted for this blog around this week. Uncannily, in Japan, last Friday, a major earthquake and a tsunami happened. Subsequently on the same Friday, another tsunami, although relatively small, affected Aurora Province) 

“I am going to Aurora,” I stated.

 “Ah, in Quezon,” almost everyone chorused.

“No, it is Aurora Province,” I said emphatically.

 Apparently Aurora has not been a part of Quezon for some decades now. But no one seems to know about this important factoid except perhaps people from Quezon and Aurora provinces. Quezon province is named in honor of President Manuel Quezon, the second president of the Philippine Republic who was born though in Baler in 1878. While Aurora province is named after the wife of President Quezon, the former Aurora Aragon who was born in Baler too in 1888. And during the Spanish period Quezon and Aurora provinces constituted the whole province of Tayabas.  In 1946, it was President Roxas, the fifth President who had renamed Tayabas into Quezon  Province and it was the legislative branch, Batasan Pambansa which approved the independence of Aurora from Quezon in 1979.

 Aurora Province has eight municipalities – Casiguran, Dilasag, Dinalungan, Dingalan, Dipaculao, Maria Aurora, San Luis and Baler. Maria Aurora is the only non-coastal town of the province which is largely bordered by the Philippine Sea at the east. And the town is named after the only daughter of President and Mrs. Quezon. Baler is the capital of Aurora, and is most famous for its beaches having large waves, terrific for surfing (Read https://letsgopinas.wordpress.com/2009/09/29/dude-wheres-my-surfboard/). But definitely there is more to this town other than the huge water undulations.

 Museo and the Garrison Church. First stop should be the relatively new Museo de Baler, a repository of the artifacts and work of art, significant to the town of Baler and its people. Here one can readily see a short history and important moments of its town through the bronze mural sculpture by National Aritst Abdulmari Imao at the museum’s façade. Outside at its rotunda, there is a steel statue of President Quezon, sitting relaxly, yet still assuming an elegant posture, welcoming the patrons and guests of the museum. Outside too at one of the pocket gardens, there is a nip hut supposedly a replica of where Mrs. Quezon was born. At its steps toward the main door, a facsimile of a cannon during the Spanish era is carefully placed.

 Inside the airconditioned museum are mementos from the rich cultural heritage of Baler’s past decades. There are santos and religious articles, and a picture of its seeming old church. There was a number of swords displayed, showcasing the artillery during the Spanish period. At a corner are antique pieces of churchbells which are important to the history of Baler as they were used to warn people of impending bad weather and even possibly – calamities.  

 Just several streets away, one can find the austere architecture of the Baler Church. It is simple looking, with post Spanish period motif. Apparently there had been an old church, made out of coral stones in the same place where the present church is. It was smallish, compared perhaps to other antiquated churches during that era, but just the same it was a symbol of the Spanish supremacy in Baler. That former church structure had been solid witness to a striking historical drama that started in July, 1898 and finally ended in June, 1899.  

 During this time the 300 year Spanish regime was already about to close by surrendering the Philippine Islands to the Americans. Apparently there had been a breakdown in communicating the news about the Spanish Government withdrawing its troops and authority over the Philippines to the political stewards and military authorities in Baler thus the soldiers and cleric decided not to abandon their hold of Baler and held fort in its church. Filipinos and even Americans had tried to persuade and convince those who were holed up in the building to abandon their cause and surrender. But the Spanish military fought it out for eleven months. And in the end many of those unwilling to give up had died either of diseases or by gunfire. This historical narration is identified as the Siege of Baler.

And recently there has been a Filipino movie produced, inspired by this account, aptly titled as “Baler.” Although the movie set of the film was mostly done elsewhere, the producers of the film have donated props and replicas used during the making of the movie to Baler Province. These are the cannon, swords, and a picture of the reproduction of the old church of Baler. Some of these are now displayed in Museo de Baler.

 To the Hill. Baler, together with the whole of Aurora, is a typhoon stricken area as the storms and tropical cyclones originate from the eastern section of the Philippines, most specially from the Pacific Ocean. Many times this part of the country will be the first ones to experience such howlers.

But there are other misfortunes that Baler has experienced through the centuries – and these are tsunami waves. Apparently there was a huge tsunami in 1735 devastating much of Baler, then known as Kinagunasan. Only seven families survived. It is told that these families ran up the Ermita Hill and escaped the floods. Among those who luckily had gotten out of the lowlands on time was the Angara family which lineage produced political luminaries such as Aurora Governor Bella Angara Castillo and Senator Edgardo J. Angara, and their father Juan Angara, three-time mayor of Baler.

Sadly, there was a recent one too – in 1970. And the waves along its coastline created extensive damage and deaths to the province as well. And the marker at Sabang Beach memorializes the event. In that same marker, Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs) warns that another occurrence of this disaster can just happen. Possibly, but not hopefully, the churchbells of Baler Church will ring again to warn its residents to flee their residential homes and run toward Ermita Hill.

Today, Ermita Hill is used as a vantage point for a panoramic view of the expanse of Baler Bay and the Philippine Sea. One can trek on foot or use a tricycle toward its viewing decks to appreciate the coastlines and be entranced with the moving tides of the ocean.

In the area, there are spanking new structures that the local government has built. With red bricks as main construction finish, similarly used in Museo de Baler, a platform stage is created as a focal point for the open-air arena. Now Ermita Hill can be a site for performances and large gatherings. At the back of the stage, a mini-zoo is being completed, with monkeys and sea eagle as initial collection.

The Indigenous and the Natural Setting. Baler is home to two groups of indigenous people – the Dumagats and Ilongots. The Dumagats are sea-farers while the Ilongots are head-hunters. Both tribes have been scarce to the streets of Baler as they have hied off to the remote outskirts, mostly in the mountains of Sierra Madre. Many of their indigenous colorful art and artifacts are being exhibited at Museo de Baler. And when there are festivals and fiestas in Baler, the Dumagats graciously attend, and even showcase their cultural dance to an appreciative audience.

Once in Aurora, you cannot run out of places to go to and not get mesmerized with its natural setting offering. In Baler, aside from the waves of Sabang Beach and Cemento, one can travel to Digisit at Barangay Zabali, just several kilometers away from Cemento, and be enthralled with large boulder rock and coral formations sitting on shallow waters of the beach. It is a dramatic seascape where considerably large waves are broken by these protective barriers. In some parts of the shoreline, sea shells  and pebbles delicately scatter around. In other portions, dark smooth stones with sharp edges abound, making the place menacing and foreboding.

But of course, this fearful sensation dissipates as you drink a couple of cold bottles of beer in one of the shacks being rented out. Some of these charming huts are just positioned to have a good view of the waves crashing into the stones.

Necessities. For food, Gerry Shan Restaurant at the main thoroughfare of Quezon Avenue is just the  place to be in – good food, ample servings, easy on the budget. As you check out the menu, there is a wide array of Filipino and Chinese entrees in this amiable place. Try their garlic chicken with buttered vegetables and mango shake – all for only 100 pesos. Of course another alternative is Bay’s Inn restobar at Sabang Beach, right in front of those surfing waters. Just stone’s throw away, there is Corrie’s for some baked goods.  Sample its carrot cake; it is moist and chewy. There is even wi-fi for those lugging their laptops.

Just in case, you are  low in cash, there are two ATM machines – at Development Bank of the Philippines and Land Bank right across the Kapitolyo.

So if you are not fit, not qualified or just not interested to surf at Sabang Beach, there is still much more to Baler,  Aurora and its waves. By the way, remember that Aurora is not in Quezon.

(lg2a) slush

Posted in artifacts, fashion, history, letsgopinas goes to america, lifestyle, locales, nature, people, technology, tradition, travel with tags , , , , , , on February 18, 2011 by mijodo

A log cabin house is blanketed with pristine white snow.  Holiday lights, running along the edge of the roofing, brighten even more the icicle drops that form on the same roofing border. Heavy snow clings on the tree branches that frame the house where you can get a glimpse at one of the windows, of the smoldering cinder at the fireplace. Such scene warms your heart, particularly when you see that amusing snowman, seemingly cajoling you to play around too in the snow covered frontage. What wintery wonder!

The whole scenario may be idyllic Christmas card pretty, particularly for us, Filipinos in tropical Philippines. But the truth of the matter is, snow may only be a good backdrop for photographs.

Some, particularly my family here in freezing Michigan, consider snow as nuisance. During winter, one needs to shovel or snow blow the driveway lest your car gets stuck at the garage. Every homeowner is required to have the front pedestrian walkway clear of snow or else, someone becomes involve in a litigation, just in case a person slips. (I, myself, embarassingly tumbled when I stepped on glassy ice at a parking lot. But how can I sue my parish church!?)

During winter season, the roads are quite icy hence driving has to slow down dramatically.  And you need to be ready with the ice scraper and sometimes the plastic shovel, once the flurry of snow cloaks your car and submerges your tires into 8 inch snow. We are not even talking about winter storms or blizzards that can cause havoc to property and people – with at least 12 inch of snow precipitation.

It may be sartorially sharp for you to buy the snazziest winter gear – including, trenchcoats, beanie caps, sweaters, and scarves, to wear for those holiday parties.  But to don a litany of accoutrements – bodywarmers, long socks, winter boots, gloves, jackets, caps, just to bring out the trash in bitingly cold nights, can be quite annoying and cumbersome.

Of course, you can revel with delight in outdoor winter games and sports –  skating on park rinks, or skiing on mountain slopes. But for those who are athritic, or don’t have enough flab and fat, they may not relish the frigidly cold temperature that the snow brings along. That innocent looking snow can be quite nasty. Thank goodness, eventually such white snow will melt and turn into dirty, murky slush that you just want to get rid of soonest.

By February 2, animals, like groundhogs in Punxsatawney, Pennsylvania, customarily become prognosticators of how long winter season will be. According to such landbeaver prediction, Spring comes in early this year, 2011.

2010 in review

Posted in architecture, artifacts, culture, events, history, letsgopinas goes to america, lifestyle, locales, news, people, technology, tradition, travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on January 3, 2011 by mijodo

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

About 3 million people visit the Taj Mahal every year. This blog was viewed about 49,000 times in 2010. If it were the Taj Mahal, it would take about 6 days for that many people to see it.

In 2010, there were 26 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 116 posts. There were 191 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 55mb. That’s about 4 pictures per week.

The busiest day of the year was June 20th with 430 views. The most popular post that day was ANOTHER FAMILY UNIT (Aurora Loft), good for four with dedicated DSL and PHONE line, starting at P1450 per night.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were pinoyexchange.com, sulit.com.ph, en.wordpress.com, mail.yahoo.com, and facebook.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for manila ocean park, imee marcos wedding, bianca gonzales, apartelle in quezon city, and fashion.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

ANOTHER FAMILY UNIT (Aurora Loft), good for four with dedicated DSL and PHONE line, starting at P1450 per night February 2010
12 comments

2

and then, there’s room for more (at again half the usual hotel price)! September 2008
86 comments

3

hot pools of pansol August 2008
16 comments

4

the great classic cotton shirt September 2008
36 comments

5

the antipolo ambient March 2009
1 comment

(lg2a) way to go

Posted in artifacts, culture, events, food, history, letsgopinas goes to america, lifestyle, locales, people, technology, tradition, travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 17, 2010 by mijodo

 

It all started with a passion for photography, and some skill in writing.  Then I started to create a blog that should document all my travels , and probably show off a portfolio of pictures and articles which have been published not only in the world wide web but also in some of the more prestigious inflight and travel magazines that have literally crossed not only the shores within the Philippines, but across the whole globe.
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For many of the travel articles on this blog, Lets Go Pinas, the writing and photography are brought about not only by my interest and skills, but because of the circumstances that have brought me to many sections of the Philippines, and lately, to the vast areas of North America.
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Several weeks ago, I was invited by my cousin Barbara, and her husband, Eliot, to check on an idyllic community, west of Detroit, Michigan, using their Recreational Vehicle or RV. Basically an RV is a motorhome which can bring all the residential trappings as you go from one place to another inside a vehicle as large as a bus.  Our RV can accommodate probably about 4 people to sleep on its beds, even while the the RV is moving.  In  our vehicle, there is a full functioning kitchen and a restroom that can even supply heated water for showers.  Of course, there are amenities like the television, a comfortable couch, and table and chairs for dining. To travel the roads using such behemoth is truly a luxurious experience.
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Just recently, another posh mode of transportation that gives that high and exhilirating feel would be gondola lifts that are propelled by cable lines usually on steep areas such as atop the mountains. This kind of vehicle provides the riders stunning scenic vistas of verdant mountains during summers or ice-capped mountain areas during winter times.
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However obviously, it is not always that I get to ride such deluxe transportation.  Many times, while travelling alone to create articles and photos for magazine publication, I get to employ lowly vehicles, such as tricycles which I usually get to rent for the whole day, at very minimal cost, to take me into the hinterlands. For me, these trikes -not the jeepneys – are the real kings of the road in the provinces since there are more of them that take you directly to the exact places, even if they are quite remote.
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But for sheer excitement, the habal-habal of many island provinces in the Philippines takes the cake.  Again for some small fare, one can lease on such services of a motorcycle, and hop on at the back of the driver, and explore outlying destinations whether in the beaches or in the hills and mountains.  It may be a little dangerous as there is no gear provided just in case accidents occur. However definitely, using such motor bikes while my face is against the wind is already an adventure in itself.
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Many times, the proverbial line – the journey may be even more interesting than the destination itself – is quite true. I personally have collected some anecdotes and stories that have wiggled out during such trips.  One time, in Ilocos Norte, I had to ask my trike driver where La Paz Ilocos Dunes was.  But the driver seemed not to know where it was, or if there even was one around Laoag. So I had to describe it through another way – where Action King FPJ had done his epic movie classics: Ang Panday (series).  In a jiffy, he was able to bring me where I had wanted.
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By just constantly hiring tricycles throughout my trip to Ilocos, I was able to gather some quaint observation about the differences in tricycle sizes from one province to another,  The ones in Ilocos Sur are a lot roomier whereas the ones in Ilocos Norte may only fit one person inside their cabs, and one may even have some difficulty in getting out from the space as their trikes are short and squatlike. 
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I have met some interesting and even familiar faces just by waiting out at the airports or bus terminals, boarding on boats and ships, talking with cab drivers and fellow bus passengers, and hanging on to dangerous habal- habal and speeding jeepneys for dear life.
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However, it is most meaningful to share transport space with family and friends – from my great parents, Lita and Glicerio, constant, travel partner, Ate Mae in the Philippines to the people here in the United States and Canada, such as my sisters, Jane and Christie, brothers in law, Edgar and Rashid, beautiful niece, Ernestine, Uncle Isdoc and Auntie Lelita, Uncle Nary and Auntie Gaying, and cousins Al and Gisela,  Baby Liz, and of course RV owners, Barbara and her husband Eliot.  Thank you very much. Till our next trip together, guys. Happy New Year, and way to go, for Year 2011!
 

(lg2a) bluest and merriest

Posted in artifacts, culture, events, food, history, letsgopinas goes to america, lifestyle, locales, news, people, religion, tradition with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 6, 2010 by mijodo

The holiday season should cheer one up. But there’s no denying, it does not happen all the time. In fact, it is during Christmas time that depression becomes even more pervasive. The sad person becomes sadder; the lonely becomes lonelier. That’s the paradox brought about by the supposed merry season.

The blues becomes more apparent for Filipinos who are outside the country.  They may be eking out a living somewhere probably in the heat of the deserts of Saudi Arabia that does not allow Christmas celebrations. Or they may just be retired and watching television alone while the frigid winters of temperate countries blow in. One can probably try to make do with what they have in order to have a semblance of the Christmases in faraway Philippines – where the season is celebrated with much anticipation and much conviction.

It is said that the Philippines has the longest Yuletide season, but in Frankenmouth, Michigan, there’s Bronner’s, a store that sells all the tinsels, ornaments, and trimmings that conjure the merriest season – all year round.  By January, right after the holiday season, you can buy such decors with significant discounts. Or if you want to plan for the forthcoming Christmas, you may visit even in hot  July and see the latest trends in decorations and gizmos that should brighten up the event by December.
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But you know and I know that nothing beats the spirit of the Christmas in the Philippines. The  morning novena masses or simbang gabi.  The crave-inducing aroma of bibingka and puto-bumbong.  The whimsy of  lights from the parol and the eloquence of the nativity scenes that deck the homes.  Kid carollers asking for money and yet insulting you just the same – “ang babarat ninyo.”  Silly games in office Christmas parties that end up with finding your Monito or Monita.  The unending shopping list for acquaintances, friends and family despite the small budget. And the exuberant embraces  and warm meals with loved ones during Noche Buena at Christmas and Media Noche at the end of the year.
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We outside the Philippines will just be glad and thankful of the joyful memories back home.  Such remembrances will lullaby us as we sleep throughout the holidays, just hoping that the blues will just move away.  Let us just comfort ourselves with such hopeful song – “I’ll be home for Christmas.” Till next year.
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Happy Christmas Dad and Mom, brother Mokoy, and my cousin, Ate Mae, Little, Nang Nida, Nang Bina, and to the drivers and workers, and friends and family back home!

(lg2a) give me the dirty, the dingy, the dazzling new york city

Posted in architecture, artifacts, culture, events, fashion, food, history, letsgopinas goes to america, lifestyle, locales, nature, news, people, religion, sports, tradition, travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 1, 2010 by mijodo

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“This reminds me of Cubao, Quiapo and Makati altogether,” one sister declared.
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Yes it can be true. Just go to the heart of New York City – Manhattan that is, and you get a melange of all our iconic busy places in Metro Manila. The monumental glass buildings and skyscrapers, and fancy boutique glasswindows remind you of Ayala Avenue. The corner delicatessens, the quaint coffeshops and small emporiums, and the ubiquitous hotdog stands are reminiscent of the old Cubao, just before the posh Gateway Mall was built. Oh yes, the seedy, dirty streets, the incessant scaffoldings blocking pedestrians, and  the chaotic volume of people, crisscrossing the grid streets (which then Manila Metropolitan Commission Governor Imelda Marcos wanted to impossibly copy for the layout of Metro Manila )of Manhattan implore a Quiapo feel overall.
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“I will never come back here,” another sister threatened. She is happy to stay in a quiet suburb somewhere in the midwest.
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It is not only her who seems to be disillusioned by New York City. Aside from the disarray of Manhattan, some have outrightly warned of the bedlam that happens in the Big Apple such as frequent muggings and  the saucy attitude by the New Yorkers. There was even a time when all patrons were forcibly asked  to leave a store just because it was already closing. My sister pointed out such crudeness to a store manager. The store got some rude awakening from a Detroit diva there!
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But it is the diamond in the rough that makes New York special and iconic to many of us non-New York dwellers. The Statue of Liberty at the harbor, United Nations Headquaters and the Financial District appeal to those who have romanticized the ideals of freedom, harmony and capitalism. The beaches at Hamptons, the artifacts of the numerous galleries and museums, the runway fashion shows of designers, and the explosion of architecture connect highly to the desires and senses of the erudite, the avantgarde, the sophisticated, and the moneyed from all over the globe.
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But for many of us, hoi-polloi, including me, it is the razzle-dazzle of pop culture that makes us warm with delight in the City that Never Sleeps. Aside from the music and stories that are churned out from musicals and plays of Broadway and the numerous movies which featured the city, it is the weekly and probably daily television shows, old and new, that familiarize us with a piece of New York life. Shows such as Seinfeld, Friends, and Sex in the City give the couch potatoes a weekly dose of insights regarding independence, fraternization and even perhaps fabulous urban living, aside from the quality comedic scripts that comeout from these shows. It is the involved appreciation of such shows that make travelling to this megapolis quite surreal and a definite treat for pop culture afficionados. 
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It is quite a testament to New York City, a city that has experienced trouble in the last few years, in terms of finance and security, of how it has remained on the top, for visitors and travellers passing by America.  No matter how shoddy and dirty New York is, the spotlight stays on that Big Apple.