Archive for Pampanga

supposedly little philippines

Posted in architecture, artifacts, locales with tags , , , , , on August 22, 2008 by mijodo

It used to be that Nayong Pilipino was near the vicinity of the Manila Domestic and International Airports in Pasay City. In that sprawling area, I remember the many depictions of the the more famous spots of the Philippines from Mt. Mayon’s perfect cone shaped figure to the several different indigenous Filipino homes where souvenirs could be bought cheap. It was the perfect area to see the “whole” Philippines to tourist who have neither the time nor the money to travel the nation’s numerous islands.

And I knew of the numerous plans to transfer Nayong Pilipino to different locations elsewhere (still near the airport) due to the expansion of the runways of the Ninoy Aquino International II terminal. In fact, there had been a contest for designers who can conceptualize best a spanking new Nayong PIlipino.

But all of a sudden, there was news that the Nayong Pilipino was transferred a smallish area at the old Clark Airbase in Angeles, Pampanga. I was perturbed with the decision. Surely, Pampanga can boast of another new tourism spot, but I was not sure of the viability of the transfer. It could be too far for those wanting to get a glimpse of what Philippines can offer culturally and in terms of travel spots.

Sad but true, Nayong Pilipino at Clark now has not been well maintained. And the time we were there, there was a handful of visitors thus even shops and eateries had to close.  After just a couple of years in the area, one could see colors of the kiping (rice chips) adorning the houses, depicting the Pahiyas Festival of Lucban, Quezon already faded. And the represented spots were very limited to Barasoain Church, Banaue Native Huts, Intramuros, and Vigan Houses among others. Well good thing for us visitors, the place did not ask for entrance fee. (On second thought, the place should have asked if only for its upkeep)

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gonzaga

Posted in architecture, interior design, locales, people with tags , , , , on August 16, 2008 by mijodo

In this quaint town of San Luis, Pampanga lies an 18th century church, beautiful in architecture, but somehow has a quiet nature about it.  Because of the church’s limited and seemingly unadorned front area, it does not demand notice and attention unlike other religious structures. Yet it is undeniable how the church inspires steady faith from the townfolks as this structure is too intimate physically with the neighboring community.

Although the church’s facade may seem to be unimposing despite the antiquity, its interior boasts of a spectacular interior mural atop the main altar, with God seated on the throne. Large capiz windows, antique floor tiles ,and handeliers that poured out from the ceiling make the church’s rich ambiance, With the able assistance of its sacristan mayor, Mr. Rey Cayanan unselfishly gives a glimpse of what is inside the Church of the Jesuit Saint, Aloysius Gonzaga.

the flag to its nation

Posted in artifacts, events, locales, people with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 20, 2008 by mijodo
Author’s note: I am featuring an article I had done for the new website, brownheritage.com (http://brownheritage.com/index.html).  I hope the readers here enjoy my other articles and the other articles written by my fellow writers in the said site.
                     
The flag was just not cooperating. I was about to take this supposedly great picture for Philippine Independence Day, but the flag was too lifeless to create a searing picture that could stir up one’s patriotic fervor. Alas the wind  was not helping.
 
As it has been told, ours is the only National Flag that can convey that the nation is at war. Once the flag is hoisted having the red horizontal band as its upper part, then war is declared with another state such as when the Commonwealth was against the Axis Nations, like Japan during World War II (1941-1944). The red is known to mean courage while the blue section – peace and unity.
 
But in relatively calmer times, it has been a rallying point to many Filipinos, most specially in international sports and competitions. The victorious boxer drapes himself  in a cloth that had been  created originally by Marcella Agoncillo for Emilio Aguinaldo’s Declaration of Independence from Spain (1898). The Filipino audience sees the blue and the red, and claps for the new hero that has just made the whole islands of  Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao proud as symbolized by the three stars in the white triangle part of the Flag.
 
In modern history, the flag has been used to bear witness in creating social changes either made in peaceful revolutions or tempestuous conflicts. The need for reforms is made more consequential, once the National Hymn or even Bayan Ko is performed in public gatherings such as in EDSA or secret hideaways in the boondocks and hills of the provincial areas . Afterall, the flags eight rays of the sun represent the first eight provinces that revolted for independence in 1896. These were Nueva Ecija, Tarlac, Pampanga, Bulacan, Cavite , Batangas, Laguna, and Manila .
 
 
But to the youngster, it is where they make their solemn pledge of allegiance or “Panatang Makabayan” on a daily basis. After reciting a daily prayer to his Creator, the school kid stands up erect in front of the waving flag and makes the oath to be the good citizen that is expected of him by his family, his school, and his government.  And the flag’s emblematic sun shows how the Filipinos have shone through to build progress for their nation despite the incredible odds and chaos through the years.
 
And to just instill life to the flag for the photoshoot, I asked my assistants to toss the flag a little bit. Let their hands be the propeller of action to the almost motionless nation flag. Lo and behold, with the help too of nature’s wind, the flag started to undulate and reveal its glory.  The flag was able to make its own dance – carefree and confident. The Philippine flag was already ready for its own close-up.