Archive for philippine food

menu for living the life at bantayan island

Posted in artifacts, food, lifestyle, locales, nature, people, travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 29, 2009 by mijodo

deliciously grilled fresh scallops

Puso (4 pcs) – P8.00

Petso (2) – P50.00

Chorizo (2) – P30.00

80z Pepsi (3) – 30.00

Total – P118.00

Yups, that’s what the  total bill is  for a late lunch at the dining area of Aling Maribel near the market at Bantayan proper.  And that is good for two people. Amazingly, not bad.

The food stalls there serve different grilled seafood and rice packed inside coconut palm leaves (puso).

Bantayan is the northern most island of Cebu. And there are three municipalities which qualities are different from each other. Sta. Fe has the powdery white sand beaches to boast about.  Bantayan proper has its 430 year old church that truly impresses. And Madridejos has the magnificent sunset view to wow its guests. 

Bantayan Island is a three hour trip from the Metropolis of Cebu. Take a Ceres bus at the North Bus Terminal or even the faster van for hire at SM Cebu to the wharf of Hagnaya. Then ride a ferry towards the port of Sta. Fe. Then you may need some help for you to explore Bantayan’s three towns. Just look for Don-don and Danny to assist you as they have their padyaks (foot pedalled cab) and motorcycle. Just call them at this number 0907-6445218. 

And since Bantayan Island has access to the freshest, mouthwatering seafood – crustaceans, shells and fish alike, particularly in this unassuming grillery, Arjaymay near the beaches of Sta. Fe. The owners can even cook up the famous rock lobster at P160 pesos per serving.

And of course, don’t forget to buy your pasalubong afterall, this is where a significant portion of dried seafood of Cebu come from. There is danggit, and there is danggit unsalted for those health conscious. Just get such just before you go on board the ferry back to Cebu city.

There is much more in living life at Bantayan. And definitely there is much more to talk about in the coming posting as well about the three towns of the island of Bantayan.

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hail, halo-halo

Posted in artifacts, culture, food, lifestyle with tags , , , , , , on March 1, 2009 by mijodo

halohalo with wafer on top

Here comes summer again.  Air can be arid and dry.  And the heat brazenly pounds on many of us, Filipinos. But one is not worried, Filipinos have concocted its own heat minimizer – the halo-halo.

Halo-halo (“Mix-mix” if translated in English) is a fancy thirst quencher, ingrained in the minds of every Filipino during the summer months of March to May.  A cornucopia of ingredients – shaved ice, ube (yam), macapuno (jellylike meat of the coconut), leche flan (custard), boiled red mung beans, kamote (sweet potato), kaong (sugarpalm seeds) and saba (a variety of banana). pinipig (rice crispies), evaporated milk – creates not only a sweet blend of flavorful refreshement, but also a delightful tall-glass or large bowl presentation, more particularly when topped with violet (ube flavored) or yellow (mango) colored ice-cream. A fiesta not only in taste, but in colors too.

There is scant literature on the origins of the halo-halo. Some say it might have come during the Japanese occupation as the Japanese then were selling shaved ice with red beans in it. Others say that it might have been in the 1920’s when ice plants were constructed, thus making the main element of shaved ice less expensive.

Through the years, the importance of  ice is highlighted. For the more discriminating, the quality of shaved ice is as important as the freshness of the ingredients incorporated in halo-halo. Ice should be truly fine and powdery, not coarse nor crushed.

As Filipinos are inventive, many have tried to recreate, retouch, and reassemble this kind of Pinoy cooler. The humble vendors in the markets would do a scaledown version of halohalo by putting less ingredients or even eliminating some of the less popular or expensive ingredients such as garbanzos and pinipig.  Others even make substitutions like slivers of  fruits like melon and mangoes. All components are then squeezed in a shorter glass, usually a coffee brand giveaway. Everything is done to economize, and yet still can give  the same effect of cooling down the average people.

Another variant becoming popular is the creamy halo-halo, made popular in Pampanga. 
This kind is focused on just several ingredients, doing away with some of the fruit and rootcrop components of the usual hal0-halo.  This version has shaved ice, leche flan, cheese, macapuno, banana, and camote, and more of the milk ingredient. In fact there are supposedly three kinds of milk in this cocoction. Thus this halo-halo produces a cream and yellow blend.

To enjoy halo-halo, at the start let the spoon slightly stab on the shaven ice and let the milk and the ice cream produce a gooey melange.  Then let the tongue distinguish the flavor of each food element. But make sure that all the stuff come together  into a meld which should compose its own textured yet luscious taste. It has been told that establishments Little Quiapo, Aristocrat and even fastfood area Chowking serve up the best halo-halo. But for those a little upscale, Manila Peninsula Hotel in Makati is touted by Time Magazine, no less, to have created the ultimate one.

Many ponderers have used the halo-halo as a tool for commentary on our Filipino psyche. The festival of colors inside a cup describes the Pinoy’s artistic eye – a fear of the unadorned.  (Look at the jeepney – another Filipino icon.)  Moreso, the concoction is also an apt symbolism of  the Filipinos’ imaginative spirit, creating something so sublime and inspired with such a hodgepodge of almost diverse ingredients. Halo-halo – so Filipino, so cool.