Archive for philippine movies

(lg2a) bakya mo, van gogh

Posted in architecture, artifacts, culture, fashion, history, letsgopinas goes to america, lifestyle, locales, nature, people, tradition, travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 5, 2011 by mijodo

Somehow this blog has reached Dutch country – Holland, Michigan, that is.

Cousin Barbara, and her husband, Eliot,  invited me to go aboard their recreational vehicle to visit the quaint city of Holland, about 190 miles, West of Detroit, or about 2 hours and 30 minutes of  drive while enjoying the lavish accommodation and some good conversation inside the behemoth vehicle.

Apparently, at that time, we missed out on some pretty tulip blossoms which usually make their abundant presence felt during the month of May. But I knew aside from the tulips, there would be other attractions that could be seen in this settlement, founded by the Dutch settlers that arrived mid 19th Century to establish their own religious sect, outside Holland – the country, that is.

And most definitely, there is a wealth of Dutch knowledge to be had at Neli’s Dutch Village Theme Park. Costumes, dances, music, and food which includes their famous cheese are all featured by young kids that come from generations of Dutch people who braved settling to this area.  The theme park and other Holland City landmarks celebrate the famous people from Holland where arts and crafts are salient part of its culture.

Famous Flemish painters like Rembrandt and Vermeer have their works featured at Holland’s museum while there is a depiction of Vincent Van Gogh, painting his famous “Sunflowers” series inside Neli’s theme park.

Aside from the windmills that create power and  the charming blue and white ceramics, it is their use of a pair of klompen that can generate some smiles and heartening guffaws from us outside of Holland.

Klompen are those danish wooden clogs, used during the olden times for farming and everyday use, specially for wet and damp grounds. It may feel hard on  the feet, but the wearer has put on thick socks for convenience. Today, klompen is just a reminder of Danish culture and tradition (even for folkloric dancing), and has become a favorite tourist souvenir kitsch, particularly the miniaturized ones.

In the Philippines, we have something quite similar – the bakya. These are wooden strapless sandals that were for everyday use, by women in their kimonas or other Filipino traditional dresses, particularly in the 1950s. Unlike in using the klompen, the Filipino women didn’t need to use socks or stockings when putting on the bakya hence it may be inconvenient on the feet. Hence the bakya production dwindled when the more comfortable rubber slippers were introduced.

But then bakya made a comback in the late 1970s up to  the early 1980s when the lowly bakya was adopted by a Filipino brand, Happy Feet. The bakya became a rage for the college crowd that went almost subversive against the elite shoe fashion brands from Europe.

During the 70s and 80s, the women and even the more avantgarde men happily wore bakyas for them to be seen as cool and unpretentious. However bakya, particularly in 1950s was synonymous to the hoi polloi or the masa hence Filipino director Lamberto Avellana angrily coined the phrase “bakya crowd,” particularly for the Filipino audience that appreciated low brow movies which the National Artist never subscribed to when making films. Today, such derogatory phrase has moved on to just one word – “bakya” – that is to describe a mentality that is unhip, unfashionable, unsophisticated and unclassy even outside the realm of movie preference, again, associated with the Filipino masses.

Are Van Gogh and his art bakya? Sosyal!

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(lg2a) oh, oscar!

Posted in artifacts, culture, events, fashion, history, letsgopinas goes to america, lifestyle, locales, news, people, travel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 4, 2011 by mijodo

 

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“Forgive them, celebrity worshippers!” one mockingly said to another while they passedby a group of frenzied kibitzers hanging around to gawk on celebrities walking through the Oscar Award at the Kodak Theater last Sunday, February 27, 2011. In the cold Los Angeles afternoon, people still waited and sorrily grasped on wire fences, even if the Los Angeles Police were asking them to get out of the perimiter that divided the stars from the spectators who didn’t have the pass to get into Oscar territory.
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Well admittedly, I together with my cousin Barbara, was one of those celebrity stalkers, hungry to gaze at some film superstars like Anne Hathaway or Steven Spielberg. But too bad, we never got to see anyone remotely well-known during our brief stake out at the very end of the red carpet where stretch limousines had dropped their celeb passengers, near the Hollywood Wax Museum.  Apparently even our hurried travel to some other parts of Los Angeles as tourists made us still awfully late in having  exceptionally rare, face to face encounters with showbiz A-listers.
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Yups to some, the experience was lame, particularly that we never had seen even one notable personality.  But this annual affair is being shown to about 2 billion people, world wide, in 200 countries. And for us, just to be at the center of the hoopla was one distinct occurrence, never to be dismissed at all. Furthermore, Pinoys who are incredibly avid Hollywood movie junkies, are big about the Oscars such that the whole event is shown live on television, preempting morning and noontime shows in the Philippines.
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 For several years now, the Philippine movie industry has tried to submit films, worthy to be among the five nominees for Best Foreign Language film at the Oscars. In fact, Filipina ace star, Judy Ann Santos, even had an earnest campaign, costing her some precious Dollars, to include her movie, “Ploning,” among the nominees several years ago. Too bad, nothing came out of it.
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However, in this year’s edition, a handful of Filipinos have been nominated in their particular categories, including 14 year old Hailee Steinfeld, nominated as Best Supporting Actress for the film, “True Grit.” Apparently, she lost to Melissa Leo of “The Fighter” though.
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There have been interesting highlights and sidelights though within the Oscars presentation itself that should tickle the Filipino in us.  In 1993, at the 65th Oscars, Lea Salonga had a lavish production number with Brad Kane. They sang “A Whole New World” which was nominated for Best Original Song from the Disney animated movie, “Aladdin.”
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In 1986, right after the EDSA Revolution, Jane Fonda had flashed a “Laban” sign on live Oscar television presentation just before she rattled off the nominees  for a particular movie category. Obviously, our revolution has gone Hollywood.
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Recently, even at the red carpet, big shot actresses sashay their stunning gowns that have been exclusively made for them by Cebu raised, Monique Lluhillier who is now based at Los Angeles. This year Mandy Moore proudly wore a creation of this now esteemed couturier.
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That afternoon, instead of getting excited about the personalities and their outfits on the red carpet, we had to make do at ogling at some bargained Oscar statuettes at $9.95 each on some souvenir shops along the boulevard.
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Then the following day, we decided to go back to the same site, hoping to get better posterity shots of the giant statue right in front of the Kodak Theater. But heck the efficient organizers had removed such gold icon early morning and the only reminder of the past evening was the installation of “The King’s Speech” as 2010’s Best Picture at one of the mini marquees that give out the theatre goers of all Oscar Best Picture Awardees since 1929 (see picture above).
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Philippine movies may not have really won at the Oscars, but just like what the other losing nominees would say, “To be part of the Oscars, is like winning itself!”  Hence, just being part of this year’s Oscars presentation makes me and cousin Barbara winners, without necessary making a speech and “thanking the Academy.”